Wales Population 2020…

The last time that Wales had a positive fertility rate, of 2.08, was in 1973. Even this would have led to a negative population growth. The fertility rate is the average number of children born to women during their reproductive years. For the population in a given area to remain stable, an overall total fertility rate of 2.1 is needed, assuming no immigration or emigration occurs. For almost 50 years, the Welsh-born population has declined, owing to lack of jobs etc. The population should now be less that the 1973 level, but for over fifty years, 90% of the Welsh population increase has come from incomers (source: National Statistics). They hardly ever come for work, being mainly a mixture of unemployed, retirees, the ill, ‘good lifers’, and overseas immigrants, with an added blend of rehomed criminals and social misfits.

The seeming population rise of over 381,000 is in reality far higher, with the absence of identity cards in Britain being a boon to certain members of the population, and employers of those on zero-hour or no contracts. The difference between live births and deaths in Wales in this period is a population increase of 36,116, not over 381,000. And many of these births are those of incoming families. As a result, well over a third of people living in Wales do not consider themselves Welsh. Over 90% of all the new housing being thrown up all over Wales is for the benefit on incoming people. Let me repeat – the true population increase of Welsh people in Wales from 1973 to 2019, over 45 years, has been just over 36,000, in a total population rise of 381,000 – 9.5%.

The massive house building programme covering Wales to satisfy England’s overcrowding has no benefit to Wales. Over 500,000 people born in Wales now live in England, usually economic migrants. By 2011, 27% (837,000) of the total population of Wales were born outside Wales, and of these immigrants 636,000 (76%) were born in England. A 2018 BBC poll, carried out by YouGov, found that 79% of people in Wales identified strongly as British, while only 62% identified strongly as Welsh.

The incredible rise in house building in Wales – leading to floods in many areas which had never experienced flooding in the past – has been 90% for incoming people, against the background of an economy constantly declining in comparison to England, Scotland, Northern Ireland and other western nations.

(In the same period the population of England grew 20.5% from 46,686,000 to 56,287,000, a rise of 9,601,000. Of this rise, there were 832,000 people with India as their country of birth, 832,000 Poland, 535,000 Pakistan, 369,000 Eire and 309,000 Germany, an increase of 2,877,000 from just five nations).


WALES POPULATION STATISTICS

Population Live

Births

Deaths Difference Change

Per 000

Fertility

Rate

1973 2,772,000 37,597 35,826 1,771 0.7 2.08
1974 2,785,000 36,206 35,634 572 0.2 1.97
1975 2,795,000 33,972 35,610 -1,638 -0.5 1.87
1976 2,799,000 33,738 36,345 -2,607 -1.1 1.79
1977 2,800,000 31,765 35,205 -3,440 -1.3 1.72
1978 2,804,000 33,308 35,963 -2,665 -0.9 1.79
1979 2,810,000 36,174 36,087 87 0.1 1.91
1980 2,815,000 37,357 35,149 2,208 0.8 1.95
1981 2,813,000 35,842 35,015 827 0.3 1.87
1982 2,804,000 35,720 35,152 568 0.2 1.86
1983 2,803,000 35,494 35,242 252 0.1 1.83
1984 2,800,000 35,861 33,652 2,209 0.8 1.83
1985 2,803,000 36,771 35,536 1,235 0.4 1.86
1986 2,811,000 37,038 34,712 2,326 0.9 1.86
1987 2,822,000 37,816 33,919 3,897 1.4 1.88
1988 2,841,000 38,824 33,981 4,842 1.7 1.91
1989 2,855,000 38,019 35,134 2,885 1.0 1.86
1990 2,861,000 38,866 33,963 4,903 1.7 1.91
1991 2,873,000 38,079 34,136 3,943 1.4 1.88
1992 2,877,000 37,523 33,792 3,731 1.3 1.87
1993 2,883,000 36,578 35,826 752 0.3 1.84
1994 2,887,000 35,366 33,824 1,542 0.5 1.79
1995 2,888,000 34,477 35,306 -829 -0.3 1.77
1996 2,891,000 34,894 34,802 92 0.1 1.81
1997 2,895,000 34,520 34,886 -366 -0.2 1.81
1998 2,899,000 33,438 33,905 -467 -0.2 1.78
1999 2,900,000 32,111 34,929 -2,818 -0.9 1.72
2000 2,907,000 31,304 33,501 -2,197 -0.7 1.68
2001 2,910,000 30,616 33,249 -2,633 -0.9 1.66
2002 2,923,000 30,205 33,314 -3,108 -1.1 1.64
2003 2,937,000 31,400 33,810 -2,410 -0.8 1.71
2004 2,957,000 32,325 32,317 8 0.0 1.76
2005 2,969,000 32,593 32,162 431 0.2 1.78
2006 2,985,000 33,628 31,083 2,545 1.1 1.82
2007 3,006,000 34,414 32,148 2,266 0.7 1.86
2008 3,026,000 35,650 32,066 3,584 1.2 1.91
2009 3,039,000 34,937 31,066 3,871 1.3 1.87
2010 3,050,000 35,952 31,197 4,755 1.6 1.92
2011 3,063,000 35,598 30,426 5,172 1.7 1.90
2012 3,074,000 35,238 31,502 3,736 1.3 1.88
2013 3,082,000 33,747 32,138 1,609 0.5 1.80
2014 3,092,000 33,544 31,439 2,105 0.6 1.78
2015 3,099,000 33,279 33,198 81 0.0 1.77
2016 3,113,000 32,936 33,047 –111 –0.0 1.74
2017 3,125,000 32,176 33,248 −1,072 −0.2 1.69
2018 3,139,000 31,274 34,406 –3,132 –1.0 1.63
2019 3,153,000 29,704 32,900 -3,196 -1.0 1.54
2020 3,118,700

The latest Govt figures are as follows:

Population of Wales: 3,118,700.

Born in Wales: 2,165,200 (69.4%). Fall from 72.6% in 2011.

Born outside Wales: 953,500 (30.6%), overwhelmingly from England.

 

Imagine the eruption if England had to take an influx of 30% incomers!

Those claiming a Welsh identity of any sort: now only 62.8%.  Fall from 66% in 2011.

(Guest columnist)


You may also like...

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.